Report

Report

In September 2014, the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies (AIMS) released a policy paper that looked at the size and cost of Atlantic Canada’s public sector. AIMS researchers Ben Eisen and Shaun Fantauzzo examined Statistics Canada data to empirically assess the claim that Atlantic Canada’s public sector is unusually large compared with other regions of the country. After careful analysis, they discovered that public sector employment rates in the Atlantic region, relative to population, are higher than the rates in the rest of Canada.

Using the methodology of that policy paper, this study examines the size of the public sector...

Earlier this year, the Frontier Centre for Public Policy and the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies published a report I wrote that showed that the cost of public education in all Canadian provinces and territories has been increasing at rates far above the growth in the economy, as measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI).1 Moreover, the study showed considerable variability across the provinces and territories. The rising cost of public education was highest in Newfoundland and Labrador at 111.1 per cent and lowest in British Columbia at 53.3 per cent. Manitoba was in the middle of the distribution for...

This analysis arrives at approximations of the value of SaskEnergy, a provincial Crown corporation owned by the government and thus the citizens and taxpayers, of the province of Saskatchewan. These valuation ranges could be useful in determining the future ownership or use of this asset. Every organization needs to review what it could or should do to serve its clients as well as review whether its present array of assets is appropriate for its strategy and future operations.

The best probable estimate of the total market capitalization, that is, the total value of the company were it to be traded...

Over the past two centuries, the world has become more urban, as people have moved to the cities to better their lives. Cities exist because, as large labour markets, they facilitate a higher standard of living for residents and reduce poverty. Governments place a high priority on these social goods. Achieving them requires that governments pursue policies that lead to higher household discretionary income (income after paying taxes and for necessities). Governments must also proactively avoid policies that reduce discretionary income. Regrettably, urban containment policy, the subject of this report, increases house prices relative to income, thereby reducing discretionary income...

This paper analyzes the fiscal condition of the four small, comparatively low-income Canadian provinces that rely on equalization payments as a source of revenue: Manitoba, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island. Specifically, we examine recent trends in the size of equalization payments to these provinces. We find that since Ontario began receiving payments in 2009/10, those provinces have experienced a marked decline in their share of equalization payments. More importantly, equalization payments as a share of nominal provincial GDP in those four provinces have declined. Finally, we analyze the impact of declining equalization payments on provincial finances. We...

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